Category Archives: Country

Fighting hidden hunger with biofortified plants

Hugo Campos

By Max Johnston

There is a form of hunger afflicting people worldwide that you can’t see.

That’s called ‘hidden hunger’––when people may be eating regularly, but still suffer from deficiencies or malnutrition.

Hugo Campos is the director of research at the International Potato Center in Lima, Peru. He says that a process called biofortification may help.

Continue reading Fighting hidden hunger with biofortified plants

How investing in infrastructure can make the world less hungry

By Ben Muir

Megan Konar, an assistant professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of Illinois, studies the intersection of water, food and trade.

As part of our series, “10 ideas to make the world less hungry,” Konar tells reporter Ben Muir that investing in infrastructure is critical.

Listen to the full conversation here. And check back next week for a new episode of our series

Making the world less hungry through agronomy management

By Ben Muir

As part of our series, “10 ideas to make the world less hungry,” Ben Muir talks to Bruno Basso, an ecosystem scientist at Michigan State University, about using legumes as a substitute for fertilizers.

Michigan State gave Basso the ‘innovation of the year award’ in 2016 for his work on crop-plant innovation and crop-plant management. He is now working with the U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization on innovative ways to quantify crop production at the end of each growing season.

Basso’s idea to make the world less hungry is rooted in agronomy management.

Listen to the interview here.

And come back next week for a new idea.

Herding up grasshoppers and locusts – to eat

The Kenyan researchers in this video are investigating the large scale use of insects as a source of protein.

The idea is to turn a food threat into a food source. They hope to  feed the insects to chickens that in turn provide eggs and meat to people. But they’re also investigating how to put a protein powder made from the insects directly into human food.

The supplement could help severely malnourished children and nursing women  while providing jobs for youth.  The insects mature quickly and contain amino acids essential to proper nutrition.

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Zero-waste cassava processing improves nutrition, family life

Worldwide more than 800 million people consume cassava.

This project by the  Tanzania Industrial Research and Development Organization works to use every bit of the popular root vegetable that requires minimal rain.

Even cassava waste is used to produce bio gas to dry the plant’s flower during the night. It’s an energy source that supplements solar drying during the day.

The project benefits women  who are often responsible for growing and processing crops while caring for families.