New fish vaccine technique could save fledgling industry time, money

A Chinook salmon raised in a hatchery. Image: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fish and Aquatic Conservation.
A Chinook salmon raised in a hatchery. Image: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fish and Aquatic Conservation.

Forget about the debate over vaccinating kids. There is no debate that vaccinating fish can allow for the aquaculture industry to grow.

recent study, published in the Journal of Vaccine, shows that a new technique offers the ability to give fish two vaccines at a time. That’s important because it could save time and money for fish farmers trying to expand a multi-million dollar industry.

Continue reading New fish vaccine technique could save fledgling industry time, money

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Paul Thompson: Food Ethics

paulthompsonIs it okay to give food to a food pantry that you wouldn’t eat yourself? Can you have another farmer sell your strawberries at the local farmer’s market?

When we think of “ethics,” we probably think of a rulebook that people like doctors follow, and people like politicians are supposed to follow but usually don’t. What do ethics have to do with your breakfast?  Paul Thompson argues that ethics and food systems go hand in hand. It’s one thing to feed people; it’s another thing to feed them ethically.

Thompson is the W.K. Kellogg Chair in Agricultural, Food and Community Ethics at Michigan State University. He is the author of over 13 books. His new book is called From Field to Fork, Food Ethics for Everyone.

Listen to an interview with him on the Food Fix podcast here.

Researchers battle disease that hinders aquaculture growth

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Although no fish with internal bleeding or bulging eyes have been reported by Great Lakes fish farms, a highly-contagious virus that causes such symptoms has bruised the profits of many in the industry.

Aquaculturists hope that new management methods can combat disease risks and reform regulations that threaten a fledgling industry.

Continue reading Researchers battle disease that hinders aquaculture growth

Matthew Herman: Watersheds


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As Earth’s temperature rises, rainfall has dropped in areas of the Southern Hemisphere. This trend has major consequences. Water will evaporate more in the coming years. Eventually this puts more water in the air and less  on the ground. That’s bad news for crops, which rely on soil moisture to grow food.

Using computer-generated climate models, researchers can see what might happen to these regions.

Matthew Herman, above, is looking at the southern part of East Africa to figure out which regions are expected to get more rainfall and which are going to get less. He discusses his research, and how it  can drive decision makers to reduce water problems.

Listen to the podcast here.