Infrastructure, traffic, sanitation are market challenges

Editor’s note: This is one of a series of posts by students from Michigan State University in the U.S. and LUANAR University in Malawi who participated in the Frugal Innovations Program of the Global Center for Food Systems Innovation.

By Edgar Binali

Monday, 10th August 2015.

We visited two markets and three supermarkets. The following are brief general observations and recommendations.

The most common challenge was the issue of food safety/quality. One striking thing was the way these markets are regulated. It seems there is no inspection on the food being sold, most especially animal products.

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Researching markets for frugal opportunities

Editor’s note: This is one of a series of posts by students from Michigan State University in the U.S. and LUANAR University in Malawi who participated in the Frugal Innovations Program of the Global Center for Food Systems Innovation.

By Mexford Mulumpa

After short presentations on Food Systems and action research methodology from our faculty members in the morning, in small groups we set off to the Tsoka and Central Markets and several super markets (Shoprite, Chipiku Plus and People Metro) in Lilongwe City.

We moved around, mainly making observations but also conducting informal interviews where possible.

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Electricity, water, food processing are market needs

Editor’s note: This is one of a series of posts by students from Michigan State University in the U.S. and LUANAR University in Malawi who participated in the Frugal Innovations Program of the Global Center for Food Systems Innovation.

By Jodie Zhu

After reading so much about the informal markets, today we finally made it to Lilongwe food markets. We visited the new town market Tsoka and the central market in Lilongwe old town, and three local supermarkets, including the People’s, Shoprite, and Chipiko.

According to the LUANAR students, food vendors originally sold their products along main roads. The Lilongwe government then created a market space and organized the street vendors in order to avoid danger, and that the marketplace is nowadays what we call the wet markets or the informal markets.

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A tale of two markets

Editor’s note: This is one of a series of posts by students from Michigan State University in the U.S. and LUANAR University in Malawi who participated in the Frugal Innovations Program of the Global Center for Food Systems Innovation.

By Kevin Mills

To say the culture is different would be an understatement. Today was my second full day in Malawi and the first experience within the markets.

Yesterday we were able to meet with the LUANAR students, get to know each other, and familiarize ourselves with where we were staying. I was not quite sure what to expect, but so far nothing too extraordinary has happened. We lost power last night – just a circuit breaker – when we walked out to investigate it, one of our neighbors in our dorm, Aaron, just said “Welcome to Africa.”

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High hopes for market solutions

Editor’s note: This is one of a series of posts by students from Michigan State University in the U.S. and LUANAR University in Malawi who participated in the Frugal Innovations Program of the Global Center for Food Systems Innovation.

By Lindsay Strong

8/10/2015

Muddy alleyways outlined with trash smoothly laid against the ground. Vendors aggressively shouting at you to buy products from them; “hey beautiful sister; come see these tomatoes- you buy?”

The foreign smell of Malawi markets, filling my lungs. I was yet to accommodate myself to the hustle and bustle of Malawian people sweeping past me.

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